germanpostwarmodern:

Church and Community Center “De Ark” (1967) in Schaesberg, the Netherlands, by Peter Sigmond

germanpostwarmodern:

Church and Community Center “De Ark” (1967) in Schaesberg, the Netherlands, by Peter Sigmond

The effects of ambient media: What unplugging reveals about being plugged in | Roberts | First Monday

miscapades:

Ask 891 students to avoid “all media” for 24 hours. What do they report? :

Even though several students felt content or calm (these two categories had the lowest overall frequency), many found that their daily routines were tied to the media devices they were asked to avoid — phones were used as alarm clocks, maps and navigators, while music devices provided entertainment during commutes, exercise and, in many cases, any otherwise unoccupied moment of the day. Some students found they had difficulty coping without their devices, as they were unpracticed in asking strangers for directions, or even uncomfortable driving, running, or walking without music. The responses in large part validated the findings of the various studies of awareness systems and ambient information.

boyirl:

Christo and Jeanne-Claude - Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin, 1995 


After a struggle spanning the seventies, eighties and nineties, the wrapping of the Reichstag was completed in June 1995. For two weeks, the building was shrouded with silvery fabric, shaped by the blue ropes, highlighting the features and proportions of the imposing structure.

boyirl:

Christo and Jeanne-Claude - Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin, 1995 

  • After a struggle spanning the seventies, eighties and nineties, the wrapping of the Reichstag was completed in June 1995. For two weeks, the building was shrouded with silvery fabric, shaped by the blue ropes, highlighting the features and proportions of the imposing structure.

prostheticknowledge:

Kepler’s Dream

Project by Michael Burk is an analogue projection device to intimately view 3D printed objects  - video embedded below:

Kepler’s Dream is an aesthetical investigation, exploring analog projection technology in the combination with computationally created content that is given a physical shape through 3D printing.

Inspired by obsolete projection technologies like the overhead projector, and especially the episcope, an installation was designed that generates unique imagery and a fascinating experience.
Mixing digital aesthetics - parametric and generative shapes - with the qualities of analog projection creates an otherworldly look that seems to be neither digital nor analog.
Interacting with the installation creates a deeply immersive effect, as the instant reaction of the projection and the “infinite frame rate“ let this fantastical world come to life.

More Here

The End of the Story — Marcus Stone via Biblioklept.org

The End of the Story — Marcus Stone via Biblioklept.org

motionaddicts:

motionaddicts:

Question Everything

Throwback Thursday

motionaddicts:

motionaddicts:

Question Everything

Throwback Thursday

street art by Mehdi Ghadyanloo

street art by Mehdi Ghadyanloo

Cyrus Farivar (Ars Technica) | US | Ask Ars - Can I see what information the feds have on my travel?

privacyandtechnology:

From the blog post:

"Lately I’ve been on something of a public records binge. I asked for records about my license plate reader data from local law enforcement agencies. I asked for complaint records from the Federal Trade Commission about a sketchy Bitcoin mining hardware maker. A few more requests are still pending. And last summer, I asked United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agency for my travel records under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Recently, I got an answer back - sort of."